From Partial To Purposeful: 5 Keys To Perfect Your Hiring Process

Mary Despe
3 min readDec 29, 2020
Photo credit: Adriy Popov (123rf.com)

If you’re like a lot of people running a business, hiring is something you say is important to your organization but may actually be something to which you don’t put the right amount of time and energy as you should.

Between raising capital, landing new customers, pleasing the current ones, and developing new products, it’s not a surprise to find yourself second-guessing how much time it takes to bring the right people onboard.

Though many founders, solopreneurs, and others tasked to bring ‘the dream’ to life have the right instincts and hard-hitting questions when talking to prospects, that alone does not make a complete nor effective hiring process. Companies should take the time to see how they do things, as a thorough review would likely yield valuable insights — and equally important, an understanding of what they might be missing from their existing procedures. In order to achieve a hiring process that’s more purposeful than partial, here are five key things to focus upon:

  • The plan. It’s often the most underrated and unsexy part of hiring. That said, it’s also the most important. It puts forth the road map of what you want to accomplish along with all the details to get it done. What questions do we ask? When are we aiming to have someone onboard? Do we want to have multiple rounds of interviews? Who should be involved? Does it make sense to try different recruiting tools or outreach tactics this time around to improve our candidate pool? These are just some of the questions that are helpful to have answered prior to starting the hiring process.
  • The process. While planning addresses important details, the process refers to the tools, systems, and methods to bring qualified candidates in the door. Furthermore, they should also reflect a consistency of actions given to all phases of hiring, and with all people — something those interviewing often miss as they meet prospects for the role. Beyond knowing that all candidates will go through a whiteboard session, for example, the process will reveal the same exercises for all candidates and share a common scoring system for results. Not only does it accomplish treating candidates equally in terms of evaluation, consistency also provides a baseline of performance — not just for the people…

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Mary Despe

Mary Despe is a Hawaii-based Career Coach. Golf, Dogs, Aloha… everyday. marydespe.com